Vegan Gluten-Free Sweet Potato Scone Recipes: 1 Sweet, 1 Savoury

 

825955DA-F9B2-4A90-BA3A-15417AC8829F I had just made some Tiger Nut Milk and also had some raw sweet potato left over from juicing and I remembered seeing a recipe on The Tiger Nut Company Instagram feed that featured scones made with sweet potato and tiger nut pulp (but you can use tiger nut flour). Yes! I thought, it’s been a year since I tried a scone recipe ( Vegan Gluten-Free Almond & Apricot Scones ) let’s have a go! So I did. They turned out so well, I made a savoury version, too: Savoury Sweet Potato Scones using almond milk pulp, nutritional yeast, ground oats and paprika – see later in the post.

The original recipe by Kimberly Parsons of The Yoga Kitchen can be found here. They are moist and filling,  can be made nutfree, using seeds instead of the walnuts, and are a great way to use up nut milk pulp.

I used a chia egg instead of a hen’s egg (1 Tbsp Chia Seeds soaked in 3 Tbsps Water to form a gel). I steamed rather than boiled the sweet potato to maximise the nutritional content, and as I didn’t have any buckwheat flour, I milled some buckwheat flakes, and it worked well.

There is no refined sugar, just a little maple syrup.

Tiger nuts are tubers, full of gut-healthy nutrients, protein, calcium, Vitamin E, B Vitamins. They make lovely creamy, sweet milk – see link at the end of the post for how to make it.

This recipe with my alterations is reproduced by permission.

Ingredients for Tiger Nut & Sweet Potato Scones

90g tiger nut pulp (or tiger nut flour)

2 tsps baking powder

35g buckwheat flour (I milled some buckwheat flakes)

pinch Pink Himalayan salt

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground ginger

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1 chia egg

180g steamed sweet potato, blended to a purée

2 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp maple syrup

30g chopped walnuts plus extra to decorate

A little nut milk to brush on top

 Method

Preheat oven to 180C

Line a large baking tray with baking paper

Whisk together Tiger nut meal or flour, baking powder, buckwheat flour, sea salt and spices in a medium bowl

Whisk the egg, sweet potato puree, vanilla extract and maple syrup until it’s a smooth paste

Add the mix to the dry ingredients and mix, adding the chopped walnuts once combined

Using an ice cream scoop, scoop mixture onto the prepared baking tray, Or small handfuls gentle rounded and flattened, brush tops with tiger nut milk and decorate with walnuts

Bake for 15-18 minutes until risen and the base sounds hollow when tapped. Allow to cool, and enjoy!

(I found the timing a bit difficult to judge as I have a fan oven and cooked them on a slightly lower heat for a little longer)

 

Savoury Sweet Potato Scones

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This time I used almond milk pulp, nutritional yeast, paprika, salt and pepper, ginger and left out the maple syrup and vanilla. They were really good, keep well in the fridge and freezer and are very filling.

***

Ingredients

(All quantities are approximate)

1 Cup Almond Milk Pulp

35g Ground Oats

2 Tbsps Nutritional Yeast

2 tsps Gluten-Free Baking Powder

1 tsp Paprika + some to dust

1/2 tsp Ginger

Pinch Pink Himalayan Salt and Black Pepper

Approx. 200g peeled Sweet potato, chopped, steamed, cooled and blended

1 Chia Egg

1 Heaped Tsp Almond Nut Butter

35g Mix of finely chopped walnuts and almonds, reserve some for decoration.

A little nut milk to brush on top.

Method as before:

Mix dry ingredients with the spices.

Whisk the chia egg, sweet potato purée, nut butter together and add to the dry mix.

Mix with a fork until it starts to come together, then knead with your hands until it forms a ball.

Form as before – I used the s allest cutter in the set – brush with a little nut milk, dust with paprika and ground walnuts.

56209B2B-AE73-48BA-AF5F-4C9B20C3A04DThe trick is to keep the dough very moist and gently flatten it to about an inch and a half to keep them a good thickness and make them light.

Cook approximately 15-20 minutes, but keep an eye on them. They should be a little crisp on the outside and moist on the inside.

Cook as before and cool on a wire rack.

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They keep well in the fridge, too.

Both versions can be eaten on their own or with nut butter, vegan cheese, or fruit spread for the sweet version.

Enjoy!

Thank you to Ani of The Tiger Nut Company and to Kimberly Parsons of The Yoga Kitchen.

(Tiger Nuts and Tiger Nut Flour from The Tiger Nut Company, link in text above).

See also: Savoury Vegan Glutenfree ‘Cheese’ & Herb Scones

Vegan Gluten-Free Almond & Apricot Scones – oh yes!

How to Make Horchata (aka Tiger Nut Milk)

Nut & Seed Milks & Smoothie Recipes

How to Make Smooth and Creamy Hemp Milk

How to Make Cashew Nut Milk & Why You Should!

Copyright: Chris McGowan

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Vegan Gluten-free Chilli-Spiced Bean and Buckwheat Burgers

0C719D06-88BB-4E34-A3DB-93CA9871BB8EThese were made some time ago, so the raison d’être is a bit hazy! I’m not sure what inspired me to try another version of vegan, gluten-free burger, I think it might have had something to do with buckwheat flakes, tiger nut flour and half a tin of beans that needed to be used up. I had also eaten up all the Nutty Bean & Beetroot Veggie Burgers I had put in the freezer (they were my favourites, I even like them cold). I was really pleased with how this new burger came together, how they handled. They were so easy cook and stayed whole. They are quite soft but the sunflower seeds give a bit of texture. Add as much or as little seasoning as you like. I was quite conservative. It’s all done in the food processor, the actual shaping takes longer than the making. I had one during Christmas week for lunch when our son cooked, he did glazed purple sprouts & carrots*, roast potatoes, mushrooms, while they all had cheese and herb sausages made by my husband (originally a Delia Smith recipe from the 80s!) Unfortunately I forgot to take a photograph! Sorry.

Ingredients

(Vegan, Gluten- free, Nutfree, Organic where possible)

1/2 Cup Dry Buckwheat, cook in stock using a third of a vegetable stock cube

A heaped 1/2 Cup Mixed Beans (tinned), rinsed and drained well

1/2 Cup Sunflower Seeds

1 Celery Stick with leaves, chopped

2 Large Chestnut Mushrooms, chopped

1 Onion, chopped

1 Medium Carrot, scrubbed and chopped

1/2 Cup Buckwheat Flakes

1 Tsp Cumin

1/2 Tsp Chilli Powder

Black Pepper & Pink Himalayan Salt to taste

Tomato Purée

Tamari

1 Chia Egg (1 Tsp Chia Seeds soaked in 3 Tbsps Water)

Gluten-free flour for dusting hands and board – I used fine Tiger Nut Flour*

Coconut Oil for frying

0C90A5A0-12F1-4D08-91C0-4B4B6447F64DMethod

Cook and cool the buckwheat.

Process everything in bursts until it comes together but still some texture.

With flour-dusted hands, scoop out some mixture and shape it into patties on a dusted board. Makes about 10, depending on size and thickness.

Cook in hot (but not smoking) coconut oil.

Drain and serve.

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*Sprouts: quartered and sautéed with lid on. Add juice of one lemon plus the rind, and paprika and salt about halfway through. Carrots: roasted with ginger. Normally uses honey too, but maple syrup would be nice.

Vegan Gluten-Free Burger (and Sausage) Recipes for National Burger Day!

Vegan Leek, Carrot & Ginger Sausages

Vegan ‘Cheesy’ Almond, Leek & Herb Sausages

Copyright: Chris McGowan

 

 

 

 

Monday Meditation: Our Family Christmas, Festive Food & Veganuary Links

  We are still in the middle of family visits, but I wanted to say I hope you all had the Christmas break you wanted and to share some photos of our family Christmas, which is still going on a week later as my daughter’s family descended en masse to celebrate New Year with us.

Family is very important to me and I love this time of year when I get to see everyone in the one place, not all together nowadays as Mum needs the downstairs room that the children use, but in stages. Mum had lunch with our daughter on the 23rd (see Monday Meditation: Mothers and Daughters at Christmas), and with our son’s family before she went home on the 27th, which meant so much to her. Because she lives ‘up North’ and her grandchildren and great-grandchildren too far south to visit her, the only time she can see them is when everyone meets in the middle at our house, which is usually at Christmas. I have a lot to be grateful for, not least that everyone can and does travel quite a distance to spend time together when health and other commitments allow.

Here are a few shots from this week – my husband is holding some homegrown potatoes he’d just dug up for lunch, and a potato bag I had bought him in which to store them. I am holding a beautifully soft wrap from him, and Mum is approving the perfume of the gorgeous handwash given to her by her grand-daughter.

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My son won £20 on his lottery ticket! His son was very pleased to be given a small share of the winnings, he was very ill and it cheered him up. 

 

 

 

 

 

Mum and I received some beautiful flowers.

Christmas food:

We made a nut roast from a Vegetarian Society recipe for Christmas lunch, which was excellent. We couldn’t find any vegan gluten-free ‘sausage’ rolls – apparently they don’t exist – so we made our own from Jusrol vegan gluten-free pastry and Dees Wholefoods vegan, gluten-free sausages. The Waitrose own vegan, gluten-free Christmas pudding was excellent and my husband and mum couldn’t tell the difference. In fact, my husband said it was the best Christmas pud he’d tasted!

 

 

The soup is carrot and sweet potato before it was blended, ready for the family visit. I made some Christmas granola for gifts (it had goji berries, apple-infused cranberries and pumpkin seeds in it for the Christmas colours, and was finished off with a red ribbon) plus some mango chutney; my grandson made us some German cinnamon biscuits and my son made us raw chocolate truffles (mine have gone already, I forgot to photograph them! They were delicious peanut butter chocolate fudge with a little rum). The bottom left picture is of the truffles I was making for the teenagers about to invade this weekend. They had marzipan centres, one batch was covered in chopped almonds and Pitch Dark raw chocolate, melted with cacao butter, the other in Mint – from The Raw Chocolate Company. The stir-fry yesterday was a welcome change from so much rich food!

On New Year’s Eve, we played a killer game of Monopoly (no prisoners taken, I was the first into bankruptcy!), and watched Star Wars: Rogue One, the teenage boys hoovering up copious amounts of (non-vegan) pizza and snacks! Here are the beautiful presents they made at school, the pouch and the sunset scene were made from hand felted wool, the candle holders are ceramic:

 

 

I always look forward to their handmade gifts. The dog was the only one oblivious to the wind and rain!

This is currently the vegan fridge:

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…and this is the non-vegan fridge:

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…because The Boys are Back in Town!

Don’t forget Veganuary begins on Monday 1st January.

Over 100,000 people have signed up this year at Veganuary.com to commit to trying to be vegan for a month. There are many health and environmental benefits to changing to a more sustainable plantbased diet. See my posts below which explain the scheme and help you find the information you need to be a healthy vegan.

Have a lovely weekend and I wish you and your families a happy and healthy 2018.

Veganuary

Veganuary – results

Environmental Benefits of Adopting a Vegan/Vegetarian Diet

Where Do I Get My Protein on a Vegan Diet?

Where Do I Get My Calcium On A Vegan Diet?

Where Do I Get Iron on a Vegan Diet?

Where to Get Nutritional Advice for Young Vegans and Newbies

Copyright: Chris McGowan

BackPacks with School Supplies for Impoverished Children via Mary’s Meals

29401648_UnknownThis backpack filled with school supplies is all ready to be collected by our Abel & Cole driver and sent on to Mary’s Meals who will transport and distribute all the donations to impoverished schoolchildren in Malawi.

Mary’s Meals was started by two Scottish brothers during the Bosnian conflict when they collected food supplies for those affected. The initiative evolved into a non-profit charity that helps provide nourishing meals for children in areas of conflict, disaster zones and poverty.

Kitchens are built and equipped near schools using local resources where possible, while school staff and parents make and serve one nourishing meal a day to the children. This in turn enables them to attend school and receive an education while also being guaranteed one hot meal a day.

They are currently helping one and a quarter million children worldwide.

It costs £13.50 to feed a child one meal a day for a year.

Many children in this country support this charity, raising funds and awareness. One young blogger, Martha at Never Seconds , has taken the charity to heart after writing reviews of her school meals and has been recognised by Jamie Oliver amd others , receiving awards for her efforts in campaigning for healthy school meals for all children.

The backpacks don’t have to be new, they can be redundant or discarded, outgrown, and you can fill them with spare supplies. I have so many coloured pencils from generations of children who have drawn and coloured in our house that I am sending some along with some notebooks, drawing paper, erasers and a ruler.

Skirts, polo shirts, shorts, sandals and flip flops, a bar of soap, toothbrush and toothpaste and a small ball can be sent too, but not toys or sweets. 

It takes hardly any effort or money but means so much to the children who receive them. 

Copyright: Chris McGowan

The Gift of Kindness At Christmas

IMG_1098At Christmas, it’s easy to get caught up in the seasonal excitement of buying and exchanging often expensive gifts we can’t afford and they don’t really need. We look forward to seeing the faces of our loved ones light up when they open our presents, the all-round smiles say it all. But sometimes it can be just a temporary happiness: the item breaks down, doesn’t fit, goes out of fashion or needs updating, it wasn’t the right model, they already have two… And then the credit card bill often provides one heck of a shock in January.

Many of us are feeling the pinch this year and Christmas can be a worrying time financially. But there are other ways of giving that bring joy and make a positive difference to the lives of the recipients which won’t almost bankrupt us when the festive season is over. There are savings we can make that could also allow us to help others in a small but significant way. (See later in the post for ways of helping others this Christmas).

Do we really need such a big tree, so much alcohol? How much do we overeat and drink only to bemoan the extra pounds on our bodies and the lack of pounds in our pockets? How much rich food gets thrown away?

IMG_1084 How many of us buy and post cards and then also wish our friends and relatives ‘Seasons Greetings’ in person or by text or social media as well?! Stamps are expensive but most people have email or can receive texts, we can send our greetings for free with news and photos of the family, for example. There are some lovely animated ecards available, see my suggestions later

Here are some ideas for spreading some Christmas cheer that will hopefully last throughout the year, some can be given as Christmas gifts to those who already have all they need and introduce children to the real message of Christmas: the gift of kindness, compassion and consideration. (For US readers, Tamara at The Purple Almond blog has written a Post listing non-profit companies who sell beautiful gifts and give back to good causes).

CARDS

  • Apart from elderly friends and relatives, we are sending seasonal greetings by email and using the money saved on cards and postage to buy food for our local food bank.
  • If you would like to send a more personalised greeting, for £9 a year to http://www.jacquielawson.com you can send as many beautiful animated cards as you like throughout the year.
  • The cards we do send will as always be either homemade from recycled items or bought direct from charities so that they receive all the profits. Even if you buy charity cards from stores, they take their cut too so the charities only receive a percentage of the price of the cards.
  • Years ago, we realised that colleagues who worked within inches of each other would wish each other a Merry Christmas *and* give everyone an individual card as well. This seemed crazy and we initiated a Christmas whip-round in lieu of cards that would be donated to a local charity which everyone voted on each year, Air Ambulance and the local hospice being favourites.

 

 

  • This year I have been painting and découpaging rocks to leave on my neighbours’ doorsteps in lieu of cards – link here to see how.
  • If you have access to foliage, you can make your own Christmas displays –much cheaper and more satisfying than buying them.

 

 

There are many people for whom compassion and kindness would be the best gift of all this Christmas. Often, all that is required is a little thought and some of our time. Perhaps you remember when you were in need but are now able to ‘pass it forward?’

SUPPORT THE ELDERLY & VULNERABLE

  • An elderly relative or neighbour, or someone who has recently lost a loved one may appreciate a phone call or visit. Christmas can be particularly difficult for people who are isolated through immobility or having no family nearby or being recently bereaved.
  • Perhaps invite an isolated neighbour for Christmas lunch or tea. Check that they have everything they need to see them through the holidays, do they need any shopping or cards posting? If the weather is icy or there has been snow, offer to clear their path.
  • Help make a refugee family feel welcome and help them settle into the community.

VOLUNTEER

In the UK, there are 2 organisations that provide advice and friendship for elderly people who could use volunteers and/or donations:

  • Volunteers are also needed at food banks and shelters for homeless people.

DONATE

  • A donation will provide a hot Christmas dinner for a homeless person at

http://www.crisis.org.uk

It costs £26.08 and they can also have a shower, haircut, health checks, clothes and advice that can potentially set them back on their feet. Even my mum asked me to reserve a dinner on her behalf this year when I told her what I had done.

  • A microloan of as little as £15 to

https://www.lendwithcare.org/

helps individuals or groups in developing countries set up their own businesses. I was given this as a gift one Christmas and each time the loan is paid off, I roll it over so someone else can benefit.

GIFTS

  • Oxfam and Good Gifts have catalogues and web sites with life-changing gifts which benefit individuals and small businesses at home and overseas, some at stocking filler prices:

http://www.oxfam.org.uk/Unwrapped

https://www.goodgifts.org

HOMEMADE & HANDMADE 

  • Homemade gifts, especially from children, are always appreciated. Children learn about giving and not just receiving. For several years when our grandchildren were young, they would give us something of their own, many of which we still have, although one of my husband’s prize gifts from our eldest grand-daughter – a plastic microphone with a loud echo – is permanently hidden away!!
  • Older children and adults can make gifts of homemade food: I used to make pickles, shortbread, petits fours, my husband made wine and beer. These days, nut butter, chocolate avocado mousse and raw chocolate truffles may be more likely.
  • My daughter knits mittens and fingerless gloves, beanie hats, socks and sleeveless jumpers.
  • My son has made kitchen chopping boards from offcuts and fallen trees, as well as belts, wallets and even clocks from discarded bicycle tyres and firehoses.
  • Last Christmas, we all made food that contributed to an extended family dinner, which occurs only once a year and was all the more special for that.

*

How many of us watch the Christmas adverts, look at all the presents we’ve bought and all the money spent on food and complain about the over-commercialisation of Christmas? How many vow that next year we will do it differently?

Make next year, this year.

I wish you all peace, love, health and happiness.

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Updated 4/12/17

Copyright: Chris McGowan

Banana Plum Smoothie with a Warming Dash of Cinnamon

imageThis is a mineral-rich smoothie with protein, fibre and omega fatty acids and a little warming cinnamon spice added now that Autumn is creeping in. Cinnamon has many health benefits including reducing spikes in blood sugar and lowering insulin resistance, as well as helping to balance your metabolism. Yellow plums are reputed to improve iron absorption, possibly due to their vitamin C content. Those with nut allergies can substitute the almond milk with tiger nut milk or any other non-dairy alternative.

All ingredients are organic, vegan and gluten-free, all measurements approximate.

Ingredients

1 Banana

1 Yellow Plum

2 Tbsps Golden Linseeds (lightly ground)

1 Heaped Tbsp Raw Hemp Seeds*

Glass of chilled Almond Milk (see here for how to make your own, it really is very easy and tastes much better than bought)

1 Medjool Date, pitted and chopped

A Dash of Cinnamon + another on top

 Blend and enjoy.

*from http://www.therawchocolatecompany.com/

Copyright: Chris McGowan

Garden Glove Love: Update

To read the original post please click here.

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A young mother sorts through rubbish in Kathmandu, using gloves from the original Garden Glove Love scheme: photo credit Liesl Clark

Some of you will recall a post I wrote earlier this year about a scheme set up by Liesl Clark of Pioneering the Simple Life. Liesl is a documentary maker and she and her family have close ties to Nepal: they volunteered there after the devastating earthquake and have been involved in various schemes to help local people, including setting up children’s libraries.

Liesl’s family are returning to Nepal this summer and they are taking with them lots of used, new, discarded, odd and paired gardening gloves to give to the child rag pickers. These children and young people support themselves and their families by picking through rubbish tips for recyclable items which they sell to India. They suffer injuries and infections from this work, sorting through sharp rusty objects, glass, faeces, chemical containers and so on.

imageSo often we read about the awful circumstances of people’s lives and feel helpless to change them. This was one instance where I decided this was something that was easily doable. Within minutes we had found 3 gloves in our house and shed.

We composed a letter to our neighbours, which my husband posted, telling them about the scheme and asking them to have a look around their homes and gardens, sheds, roadsides etc. I heard nothing for a long time and thought that was it. I’d failed miserably.

Then slowly, they began trickling in. We found a bag of gloves on our doorstep one morning, we still don’t know who left them, imageand a neighbour brought a bag of new ones in children’s sizes, then the lovely lady who eventually took our piano also brought some. Gradually, we built up quite a collection.

This was the pile that were new or unsoiled.

Then there were the very soiled ones that had to be washed and hung out to dry – a difficult task as it wouldn’t stop raining for more than an hour at a time!

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Eventually, they did dry out and were parcelled up. Liesl has arranged for an archaeologist friend to take them out for us.

And off they went.

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We wish Liesl, her family and Mark bon voyage and hope we have helped in a small way to improve the lives of some of the most economically deprived people. They have welcomed Liesl and her family and friends into their community, taken care of her children, taught them skills and customs, enabling them to experience a different culture and a new perspective on the world. Liesl has made a documentary about their lives after the earthquake. She continues to support them and to highlight their strengths and their needs.

This was the least we could do.

Copyright: Chris McGowan

“a life to which I feel myself a stranger.” -Swiss Long Rider Ella Maillart

A welcome update from Marc on his Long Saunter South through Central and South America, where he raised money and awareness for children in orphanages and special needs schools, and news of Red, his faithful steed!

The Long Saunter South

Several months ago I returned home, to my loving family whom have been there with me every step of this journey. Still, months later it does not feel real. Taking in what happened and feeling out of place in my home town. It can be hard to process the changes that occur, not only within but the advances in the “civilised world” wifi, fingerprint recognition, smart phones, faster connections and no, I am not on snapchat. A lot can change in four years. Life seemed a lot more simple out on the road ….. however, I am not missing the chicken soup.

Lotus-Root-Rice-Bean-and-Chicken-Feet-Soup

Red, my horse, I am reliably informed is doing well, I wake every morning thinking of him, sometimes still disorientated enough that I jump up shouting his name, looking for him. He is safe and healthy with the wonderful family I got to spend time with in Ecuador…

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Garden Glove Love

This is such a simple but potentially life-changing scheme initiated by pioneering the simple life: collect discarded/lost gardening gloves, pair them up and send to Nepal to help child rag pickers protect themselves from glass, excrement, chemicals, and infections. We should all get behind this: we’ll be searching the shed, the cupboard under the utility room sink and collecting from our neighbours and family – it may take some time, we are spread over the country, but eventually we’ll parcel them up and send them off. Great idea!

Update: 3 days later, we have the beginnings of a collection!

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Pioneering The Simple Life

Roadside Garden Glove. Photo © Finn Clark

It all started on a bike ride. We kept seeing garden gloves along the side of the road. In fact, we had seen the gloves lying there for weeks and finally decided to pick them up. One by one, over the course of about 2 weeks, we had managed to collect 20 pairs!

I Have Good Garden Glove Karma. Photo © Liesl Clark

We’re an island of avid gardeners, farmers, and a world-famous garden tour called “Bainbridge in Bloom.” Twelve months of gardening weather here on Puget Sound has afforded us 4 seasons of dirt digging. The problem is that the gardeners’ (or perhaps it’s the hired landscapers’) gloves too often end up along the sides of the roads, having fallen from the backs of landscaper’s trucks, farmers’ tractors, or islander’s cars. Being a food-grower myself, I couldn’t just let those gloves rot in the ditches.

Garden Gloves Rain or Shine. Photo © Finn Clark

My children and I have been collecting them: pulling to the side…

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How Underground Networks Can Outperform Aid Orgs

We all sit at home watching or reading the news about disasters such as last year’s earthquake in Nepal and, other than donating money to relief organisations, we think there’s nothing else to be done and move on to the next news item. With supplies being tied up in red tape, stolen or resold at exorbitant prices and eventually running out, these individuals looked at the bigger picture and via social media organised an underground relief network that really did make a difference to many villagers who might otherwise have perished. With so many disasters of one kind or another in the world, it can often be overwhelming if not paralysing. This article shows how it can be done and will hopefully stir others into action. Please read and repost.

Pioneering The Simple Life

It was less than a week after the April 25th, 2015 magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit Nepal that we came to realize little-to-no relief had reached villages beyond Kathmandu. Roads were dangerous; But even worse, as time progressed, supplies for temporary shelter for the over 2 million now homeless had dried up. Tents and tarps were sold out in Kathmandu. Foreign governments and aid organizations were being shut down at the airport, their incoming supplies requisitioned by Nepal customs, and much-needed food, tents, tarps, blankets, and medical supplies were sitting on the runway, tied up in a confounding wad of red tape. 

7_Damaged house.anup © Anup Gurung

Our friends in Nepal were frantic, texting us asking for any means to get materials over to the remote villages. Aid organizations trucking supplies to villages were stopped along the roads by desperate, angry, and hungry people who lived right along the road who also had seen no relief. Supplies were…

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